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August 28, 2013

Troy schools score high on new accountability ranking

By Terry Oparka
C & G Staff Writer

While most of the schools in the Troy School District scored in the 90th percentile and got yellow ratings in the new color-coded Michigan School Accountability Scorecards, three schools scored lower, although district officials noted those schools made progress from last year.

Anne Mull, director of instruction and assessment for the Troy School District, said the Michigan Department of Education requested and received a waiver for the requirements of No Child Left Behind — including a waiver for the requirement that all schools meet the 100 percent student proficiency targets by 2014.   Under the federal No Child Left Behind legislation, all states were required to establish annual English language arts and mathematics proficiency targets and reach 100 percent by the 2013-14 school year.

“One of the conditions of our state receiving the waiver was that the Michigan Department of Education had to create an accountability system based on standards and on closing the gaps between the highest performing students in schools and districts, and the lowest performing students,” Mull said in an email. “Other conditions for approval of the waiver of NCLB for our state were the expansion of teacher evaluation systems and alignment to career- and college-ready standards.”

The Michigan School Accountability Scorecard uses a five-color coded system to indicate the performance of schools and districts and combine traditional accountability metrics with Top-to-Bottom, Priority and Focus school designations and other state/federal requirements. 


Colors are determined by points accumulated for goals met, or by demonstrating improvement. 
The color green is highest, and indicates most of the goals were met. The color red is lowest and indicates few objectives were achieved, and is an area that requires attention. Yellow designates districts and/or schools that attained between 60 percent and 70 percent of possible points.

All schools in the district, including Niles Community High School, were ranked yellow, with the exception of the Troy Continuing Education program, which was ranked red. Overall, the district was ranked yellow.

This new color-coded system provides a meaningful diagnostic tool that gives schools, districts, parents, and the public an easy way to identify strengths and weaknesses,” said state Superintendent Mike Flanagan in a prepared statement. “It provides greater transparency and detail on multiple levels of school performance.”

The three lowest-scoring schools in the Troy School District — Morse and Troy Union elementary schools and Baker Middle School — each posted gains from last year’s ranking.

“We are proud of the rankings of all of our schools but, in particular, celebrate the gains at Baker, Troy Union and Morse,” Mull said. “These are three of our Title I buildings and they have the largest percentage of economically disadvantaged students of all of the schools in our district.  We can see that our teachers’ focused efforts to improve learning for all students across the Troy School District are working, in particular for students who may be living in poverty.”

To access more information on the Michigan School Accountability Scorecard, check online at www. michigan.gov/mdeWhile most of the schools in the Troy School District scored in the 90th percentile and got yellow ratings in the new color-coded Michigan School Accountability Scorecards, three schools scored lower, although district officials noted those schools made progress from last year.

Anne Mull, director of instruction and assessment for the Troy School District, said the Michigan Department of Education requested and received a waiver for the requirements of No Child Left Behind — including a waiver for the requirement that all schools meet the 100 percent student proficiency targets by 2014.   Under the federal No Child Left Behind legislation, all states were required to establish annual English language arts and mathematics proficiency targets and reach 100 percent by the 2013-14 school year.

“One of the conditions of our state receiving the waiver was that the Michigan Department of Education had to create an accountability system based on standards and on closing the gaps between the highest performing students in schools and districts, and the lowest performing students,” Mull said in an email. “Other conditions for approval of the waiver of NCLB for our state were the expansion of teacher evaluation systems and alignment to career- and college-ready standards.”

The Michigan School Accountability Scorecard uses a five-color coded system to indicate the performance of schools and districts and combine traditional accountability metrics with Top-to-Bottom, Priority and Focus school designations and other state/federal requirements. 


Colors are determined by points accumulated for goals met, or by demonstrating improvement. 
The color green is highest, and indicates most of the goals were met. The color red is lowest and indicates few objectives were achieved, and is an area that requires attention. Yellow designates districts and/or schools that attained between 60 percent and 70 percent of possible points.

All schools in the district, including Niles Community High School, were ranked yellow, with the exception of the Troy Continuing Education program, which was ranked red. Overall, the district was ranked yellow.

This new color-coded system provides a meaningful diagnostic tool that gives schools, districts, parents, and the public an easy way to identify strengths and weaknesses,” said state Superintendent Mike Flanagan in a prepared statement. “It provides greater transparency and detail on multiple levels of school performance.”

The three lowest-scoring schools in the Troy School District — Morse and Troy Union elementary schools and Baker Middle School — each posted gains from last year’s ranking.

“We are proud of the rankings of all of our schools but, in particular, celebrate the gains at Baker, Troy Union and Morse,” Mull said. “These are three of our Title I buildings and they have the largest percentage of economically disadvantaged students of all of the schools in our district.  We can see that our teachers’ focused efforts to improve learning for all students across the Troy School District are working, in particular for students who may be living in poverty.”

To access more information on the Michigan School Accountability Scorecard, check online at www. michigan.gov/mde

You can reach C & G Staff Writer Terry Oparka at toparka@candgnews.com or at (586)498-1054.