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Royal Oak

November 18, 2013

Full-capacity shelter seeks families for adoption, volunteers

By Robert Guttersohn
C & G Staff Writer

» click to enlarge «
Ilene Zakul-Krupa, of Royal Oak, pets Mowgli, a 1-year-old cat who has been at the shelter since Sept. 6. As of Nov. 14, the shelter had 26 cats and 7 dogs.
 

ROYAL OAK — Pam Wilson, a volunteer at the Royal Oak Animal Shelter, says it’s not uncommon for the shelter to be full. It’s just a part of the business.

“It goes in cycles, pretty much,” Wilson said. “We do get full quite a bit, but somehow we manage to get them adopted.”

Now, the shelter is full, and volunteers say they are looking for families to adopt a cat or dog or to foster pets that require medication.

As of Nov. 14, the shelter had 26 cats and 7 dogs, each with their own stories of how they arrived at the shelter.

“For most of them, what happened was we had people who lost their job, moved or gave up their house because they can’t pay for it any longer,” said shelter volunteer Ilene Zakul-Krupa. “It has to do with economy, and sometimes, too, they don’t want to deal with the illness of the cat.”

Wednesday, a white longhaired domestic with brown spots, is the shelter’s longest tenant. Zakul-Krupa said she had been there since August of last year.

“You couldn’t touch her,” said Zakul-Krupa of when Wednesday first arrived.

After months of socializing with the calico cat, she now comes out of her cage.

“When I open up her cage, she comes out and I let her run around,” Zakul-Krupa said.

She added that if people adopt from the shelter, the volunteers counsel them on the spot and make follow-up calls to ensure everything is going smoothly with the new pet.

“We do a lot of counseling over the phone,” she said.

The shelter also is looking for people to foster dogs and cats, particularly the ones who need a quiet place to rest while under medication.

For example, Wilson said they have a pit bull mix that is heartworm positive and needs to be put on medication that requires quiet — something that is hard to come by in the dog end of the shelter.

In addition to families, the shelter is looking for volunteers willing to take on a variety of chores — from cleaning to walking the dogs.

They particularly need a handy person who can help with some of the more laborious summertime tasks.

Additionally, the shelter is in need of supplies and food, and is seeking permanent donations, like a larger storage shed.

Both the animals available for adoption at the Royal Oak Animal Shelter and the supply needs can be found on the Royal Oak Animal Shelter’s website, www.ROAS.petfinder.com, or by calling the shelter at (248) 246-3364.

The shelter, located at 1515 N. Edgeworth Ave., is open for adoption from 4-7 p.m. Mondays through Fridays.

You can reach C & G Staff Writer Robert Guttersohn at rguttersohn@candgnews.com or at (586)218-5006.