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August 14, 2014

Over 100 artists show their finest on the lake

By Terry Oparka
C & G Staff Writer

» click to enlarge «
Jennifer Xerri, of Starlily Creations, shows Susanne Dicker, of Troy, her fiber arts during the Art-on-the-Lake show at Northfield Hills Condominiums Aug. 25 of last year.

Over 100 artists will unveil their creativity at the 40th annual Northfield Hills Art-on-the-Lake show this year.

Kathleen Deburghgraeve, who coordinates the show with Connie Kohn, said the event started out with artists who lived in the Northfield Hills Condominium Association and evolved into what it is today.

Deburghgraeve said many artists return each year because they like the “one-day, easygoing show” in a beautiful setting, against the backdrop of the Rouge River tributary. 

Deburghgraeve explained that Kohn canvasses fine art shows around the state with the aim to let artists know about Art-on-the-Lake.

“We get lots of return artists,” Deburghgraeve said.

“It’s usually the last fine art show of the summer. It’s very user-friendly,” she said.  “It’s a very easy show for the artists to be in.”

“I met the organizers at another show; I was impressed by the fact they personally seek out diverse works for their show. I had heard good things about the show from other artists, as well, so I jumped on board,” said David Lamberti, a ceramic tile artist from Berkley, via email.

He said ceramics, much like other art forms, “are very organic. Showing art in a natural setting feels right.”

When asked what inspires him, he said, “I’m all over the place with that question; abstract and impressionist art, the pop art of the 1960s, architecture, a shadow on the sidewalk, a funny conversation with a friend. I’m pretty untraditional as far as ceramic artists go. I like to tell stories with my pieces and think of the clay more as a canvas than a form.”

He describes his pieces as illustrative and abstract.

“I do my best to make sure each piece is unique and produce each design in limited editions,” he said.

“In general, I don’t think people realize that our region is overflowing with amazing artists; we are really fortunate,” Lamberti added. “The depth, diversity, creative energy within the local creative community is really inspiring.”

The event will also feature performances by Gilda’s Singers and the Troy High School orchestra, as well as children’s activities. Food vendors will offer fair fare, including kettle corn, roasted nuts, fudge, fresh-squeezed lemonade, hot dogs, hamburgers, soft pretzels, Italian sausage, ice cream, cotton candy, caramel apples, coffee, pop and water. Rides on a Troy Fire Department ladder truck will be available. 

The juried art will include pottery, watercolor paintings, fiber art, metal work and stained glass. The wares will be on view at the 40th annual Art-on-the-Lake 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Aug. 24 on the grounds of the Northfield Hills Condominium Association, 1750 Brentwood Drive, on the corner of Coolidge and Long Lake. Ample parking is free, organizers say, but donations may be made to the Boy Scouts of America, who will supervise the parking area.

There will be five drawings for gift cards each hour, and the winner need not be present.

For more information, visit www.artonthelake.com.