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Farmington, Farmington Hills

August 14, 2014

Art group adds color, foundation to members’ lives

By Sherri Kolade
C & G Staff Writer

FARMINGTON/FARMINGTON HILLS — Annetta Lind’s passion to paint doesn’t come with a price tag.

The 83-year-old Farmington Hills resident, who has been painting before she could even drive — her first job was painting faces on china dolls at age 15 — said she will continue to paint, even if she doesn’t make a dime from it. 

“I always had my art,” Lind said. “I don’t care if I ever sell a painting — that is not my purpose. But the best thing about art is the nice people you meet.”

Lind said the Farmington Art Foundation is chock full of like-minded men and women who care about art and community service.

As a member of the foundation for nearly 50 years, Lind — described as the group’s historian — has seen a flux of membership highs and lows within the foundation, which was formed in the fall of 1965 after a group of women saw a need for art in the community.

“Five ladies — only one is alive now — decided we needed an art club,” said Lind, who was at the first meeting at O.E. Dunckel Middle School for the group then called the Farmington Artists Club.

“We learned as we went along and tried to improve some of the things that our club does that always supports our foundation status,” Lind said.

At one point, the group had a waiting list, because only 150 people were allowed to gather at a meeting because of fire hazards, per the fire marshal’s order.

The group currently has around 100 members.

The foundation’s goal is to spur interest in the creative arts through lectures, workshops, exhibits and a number of other artistic ventures.

September through May, the foundation hosts meetings at 6:45 p.m. every second Wednesday at the Farmington Community Library’s main branch, 32737 W. 12 Mile Road. There will not be a December meeting.

“It is a worthwhile group,” Lind said.

During a late July lunch date at the library’s bustling café, FAF President Pat Langner and publicity chair Clarine Boles said the group helps artists get to know one another.

“I think I joined because I wanted to meet other artists,” Langner said in between bites of half a Snickers candy bar that she shared with a passing patron. “By spending time with other artists and listening to different programs, (it) helped me to become more active in the arts. It gave me more encouragement to paint. When you are with other people who have like interests, it kind of gives you impetus to do more.”

After moving to Michigan from Virginia in 1979, a “very young” Langner began selling her artwork in 1982. She began attending the Farmington Founders Festival the same year.

“I know a whole lot of people in Farmington,” she said. “I really love the people in Farmington. they’ve been very supportive.”

She considers Boles to be her sister.

Langner, whose favorite medium is acrylics, said she also likes water-based oils, and creates miniature paintings based on pictures of places she has traveled to.

“I travel a lot. I take pictures of many, many barns,” she said. “Barns are my favorite. Churches are painful to do,” because of the level of intricate detail.

Burgeoning artist Boles, retired from a career in education, said she joined the foundation after taking classes at the Costick Center several years ago.

Langner said her vision for the foundation is to become a tighter-knit community group with “enthusiasm” for art.

Linden said the originally all-female group has grown, and she encourages others to join and grow, as well.

“It is a common interest more than anything,” she said. “As long as I am here, I will be part of the club because it is dear to my heart.”

She added that some people have their football and golf — she has her art.

“It is good to have something to focus on,” she said.

The FAF has a spring exhibit each year at the Costick Center. 

The first meeting is set for Sept. 10.

For more information, go to http://www.farmingtonartfoundation.org/.